Henry G. Jones

Partner

Biography

Henry Jones is a Washington attorney who is dedicated to helping people who are injured through no fault of their own. Henry focuses his practice in the areas of insurance bad faith, products liability, wrongful death, personal injury, and complex commercial litigation. Henry represents individual clients in Washington and throughout all of the United States.

Prior to joining Friedman | Rubin in 2009, Henry was an attorney with Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld in Washington, D.C. from 2006 to 2009 and focused his practice on complex civil defense litigation and white-collar criminal defense.

Henry received his undergraduate degree from New Mexico State University in 2001 and his J.D. from the State University of New York at Buffalo Law School in 2004. He went on to earn his L.L.M. from Georgetown University Law Center in 2005.

Henry is a member of the Alaska, District of Columbia and Washington State Bar Associations and is admitted to practice before the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals in San Francisco.

To contact Henry, you can email him at hjones@friedmanrubin.com.

Select Published Decisions

Amburgey v. Major Elkhorn Mining Co., LLC, No. 07-CI-00056, 2015 WL 1726533 (Ky. Cir. Ct. Apr. 14, 2015)

Granting plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment finding insurer in breach of contract and liable for all damages naturally flowing from failure to defend.

Karpenski v. Am. Gen. Life Companies, LLC, 999 F. Supp. 2d 1235 (W.D. Wash. 2014)

Denying insurer’s motion for summary judgment because Washington’s “mend the hold” doctrine precluded insurer from seeking rescission based on any allegations other than nondisclosure of joint and musculoskeletal disorders in insured’s disability application.

Murriel-Don Coal Co., Inc. v. Aspen Ins. UK Ltd.,  2011 WL 12686635, No. 10-CI-00318, (Ky. Cir. Ct. Nov. 28, 2011)

Granting plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment finding insurer in breach of contract and liable for $42,000,000 judgment.

August v. Provident Life & Acc. Ins. Co., 772 F. Supp. 2d 1197 (C.D. Cal. 2011)

Granting plaintiff’s motion for summary judgment finding insurer in breach of contract since conduct of insurer secretly treating insured’s claim as one based on “sickness,” rather than as “injury,” was inequitable.

Education

Georgetown University Law Center, L.L.M., 2005

State University of New York Buffalo School of Law, J.D. 2004

New Mexico State University, B.A., 2001